How does one present/sell a technology to Oracle (or MS for that matter)?
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Thread: How does one present/sell a technology to Oracle (or MS for that matter)?

  1. #1
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    How does one present/sell a technology to Oracle (or MS for that matter)?

    I am an application developer who has developed a secure technology to prevent unauthorized access to a database from applications. It is specifically written in .NET as that seems to be the greatest culprit, but it also works as a software development data access layer for any object-oriented app.

    Clean and simple, the full code can be scanned and understood in less than 20 minutes. Extremely fast. It FORCES best practices and will not run without good n-tier design. However, it makes that very simple and easy with no configuration and code generation for Stored Procs and classes.

    Security: It will not allow SQL to the database. ALL access via stored procedures. The DBAs will like its architecture.

    Also, my strong recommendation to all companies that are using this technology (in use for 10+ years in Java, VB6, and C# varieties) is a single DBA become a public officer of the corporation. VP of Information Security or something. That DBA/VP safeguards the data (bank or Facebook, etc.)

    How do I present this to Oracle or MS? Application development can be VERY simple. Self unit-tests on every run automatically. Fast as can be. In .NET lingo one might call this the System.Persistence namespace.

  2. #2
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    You don't need to sell it to Oracle, when you can sell it to Oracle's customers.
    If the software is that good, you can sell it to companies that develop code in .NET.
    But if you wrote it in .NET, it is likely that someone else has already written it in .NET,
    or could write it in .NET without your help. Hence you might have trouble making
    money from that code.

    Good luck with that!
    this space intentionally left blank

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by gandolf989 View Post
    You don't need to sell it to Oracle, when you can sell it to Oracle's customers.
    If the software is that good, you can sell it to companies that develop code in .NET.
    But if you wrote it in .NET, it is likely that someone else has already written it in .NET,
    or could write it in .NET without your help. Hence you might have trouble making
    money from that code.

    Good luck with that!
    I do agree with that sentiment, in general.


    However, nope. No one has duplicated this code. And, interestingly enough it is so simple, it cannot be rewritten in any other way. Here is the end user syntax:


    Ring r = new Ring();
    r.Type = "Lord";
    Database.Load(r);

    Hobbit h = new Hobbit();
    h.Name = "John";
    Database.Load(h);

    h.Rings.Add(r);
    Database.Store(h.Rings);

    h.Deliver(); 'stores relevant data internally using "Database.Store something";


    No configuration. All data access via stored procedures. Stored procedures and classes can be auto-generated from tables. Essentially it is MS' System.Persistence namespace.

  4. #4
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    So your strategy is?

    One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
    One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them


    It just seems like the wrong tool for the job. Using object oriented techniques
    for relational data doesn't seem like the most efficient method of managing data.
    The classic square peg, round hole problem.
    this space intentionally left blank

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by gandolf989 View Post
    So your strategy is?





    It just seems like the wrong tool for the job. Using object oriented techniques
    for relational data doesn't seem like the most efficient method of managing data.
    The classic square peg, round hole problem.
    Yes, I agree. That is the exact correct answer. Big difference between managing data and application development.

    The above describes "application data access". It works for web, desktop, mobile, or anything else.

    Managing data (and securing it) is for the DBAs.


    I do not have a strategy. I have waited around 10+ years and used this data access methodology since then. It makes application development so simple, it is almost a joke. My last contract went live with zero bugs. It just works. Terrible database design underneath it too. Many-to-many inverse add-on relationships and complexities... However, turned everything into Lists and Items and the web app was pretty rich too.

  6. #6
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    Please do not take it the wrong way but...

    Quote Originally Posted by andrewbb View Post
    I do not have a strategy.
    This is really bad news, you have to have an strategy, you have to have a business plan, you have to have a way to show the value added, you have to have a ROI analysis... just for starters.

    Quote Originally Posted by andrewbb View Post
    I have waited around 10+ years
    Every single idea, innovation, etc. has a temporal window of opportunity - 10 years seems to be a long time and perhaps the window is about to close if it hasn't closed yet.

    Remember, Alfred Russel Wallace developed the Theory of Evolution but Darwin gets the credit just because Darwin read one of Wallace's papers and rushed to publish his own - the one he had being working on for a long time.


    In short, figure out an strategy and do not wait ten more years to do so.
    Pablo (Paul) Berzukov

    Author of Understanding Database Administration available at amazon and other bookstores.

    Disclaimer: Advice is provided to the best of my knowledge but no implicit or explicit warranties are provided. Since the advisor explicitly encourages testing any and all suggestions on a test non-production environment advisor should not held liable or responsible for any actions taken based on the given advice.

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