OFA example in windows
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Thread: OFA example in windows

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    OFA example in windows

    hi,
    does anyone have a working example of OFA in a windows environment that I can see the directory structure layout of?
    We are in the process of buying a new server, and I want to make sure it has enough volumes on it to suit OFA. I also want to make sure I site the correct datafiles/log files/archive files etc in the correct folders.
    I have found some examples for unix, but find them all a bit confusing.
    I only intend to have one version of Oracle (i.e. one oracle home) for now anyway!

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Washington DC
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    Create Sample database(can be dropped later) at the time of Oralce Installation on windows which creates OFA structure. Else you can create template for the database and open the scripts which shows OFA directory, database creation scripts you can floow to acheive the same.
    Reddy,Sam

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    Mesa, Arizona
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    I get the intent of OFA, but I like to simplify it a bit.

    $ORACLE_HOME's
    /u1/oracle/9.2.0.5
    /u1/oracle/10.1
    /u1/oracle/10.2

    My preference is an ASM diskgroup for everything else 10g, but if I have to use a file system;

    Stripe drives and put

    1 ctrl file, redo, undo, temp, data datafiles in:
    /u2/oradata/

    1 ctrl file and index datafiles in:
    /u3/oradata/

    I just hate typing 'app/oracle/product' bla bla bla
    "I do not fear computers. I fear the lack of them." Isaac Asimov
    Oracle Scirpts DBA's need

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenEwald
    1 ctrl file, redo, undo, temp, data datafiles in:
    /u2/oradata/

    1 ctrl file and index datafiles in:
    /u3/oradata/

    I just hate typing 'app/oracle/product' bla bla bla
    I tend to simplify the directory structure as well. If I got paid by the word typed, I might use '/app/oracle/product' etc.
    this space intentionally left blank

  5. #5
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    how about '/app/oracle/product/database/10.2/db_1'

    I simple create a alias called home for the oracle home and it takes me there and don't have to type it every time
    Amar
    "There is a difference between knowing the path and walking the path."

    Amar's Blog  Get Firefox!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    69
    Hi There,
    I am looking into this on Windows also and have come across following info

    Code:
    C:\oracle             --First logical drive
    
        \ora10            --Oracle home
    
          \bin            --Subtree for Oracle binaries
    
          \network        --Subtree for Oracle Net
    
          \...
    
        \admin            --Subtree for database administration files
    
          \prod           --Subtree for prod database administration files
    
            \adhoc        --Ad hoc SQL scripts
    
            \adump        --Audit files
    
            \bdump        --Background process trace files
    
            \cdump        --Core dump files
    
            \create       --Database creation files
    
            \exp          --Database export files
    
            \pfile        --Initialization parameter file
    
            \udump        --User SQL trace files
    
    F:\oracle             --Second logical drive (two physical drives, striped)
    
        \oradata          --Subtree for Oracle Database files
    
          \prod           --Subtree for prod database files
    
            redo01.log    --Redo log file group one, member one
    
            redo02.log    --Redo log file group two, member one
    
            redo03.log    --Redo log file group three, member one
    
    G:\oracle             --Third logical drive (RAID level 5 configuration)
    
        \oradata          --Subtree for Oracle Database files
    
          \prod           --Subtree for prod database files
    
            control01.ctl --Control file 1
    
            indx01.dbf    --Index tablespace datafile
    
            rbs01.dbf     --Rollback tablespace datafile
    
            system01.dbf  --System tablespace datafile
    
            temp01.dbf    --Temporary tablespace datafile
    
            users01.dbf   --Users tablespace datafile
    
    H:\oracle             --Fourth logical drive
    
        \oradata          --Subtree for Oracle Database files
    
          \prod           --Subtree for prod database files
    
            control02.ctl --Control file 2
    Is it suggesting for the F: Drive that there is no redundancy here for disk failure?
    This is where it suggests the data and redo logs go.

    The G: Drive has raid 5 for index and system files.

  7. #7
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    Cool

    Go for it!
    "The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person doing it." --Chinese Proverb

  8. #8
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    You should not reopen a 7 year old thread to ask a new question.

    Here are the steps as I see them,

    1. Order the best windows server that you can afford, with the best SAN that you can get
    2. When the server arrives, format the disks and install Redhat 5.8
    3. create relevant users and raw disk volumes for ASM
    4. install Oracle and ASM
    5. create your ASM instance, with at least one disk group for your data files
    6. create your database using ASM
    7. run over the windows media several times with your car, then run it through a wood chipper to render it harmless
    8. install you schema in the database
    9. configure your listener
    10. crack open a beer!
    11. now you are done!


    this space intentionally left blank

  9. #9
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    Ft. Lauderdale, FL
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    mmmhh... just a doubt, on step #7 - can it be done back and forth or it is advisable to run it over always in the same direction?
    Pablo (Paul) Berzukov

    Author of Understanding Database Administration available at amazon and other bookstores.

    Disclaimer: Advice is provided to the best of my knowledge but no implicit or explicit warranties are provided. Since the advisor explicitly encourages testing any and all suggestions on a test non-production environment advisor should not held liable or responsible for any actions taken based on the given advice.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by PAVB View Post
    mmmhh... just a doubt, on step #7 - can it be done back and forth or it is advisable to run it over always in the same direction?
    I would turn my wheel back and forth to get full coverage.
    It's best to be thorough.
    this space intentionally left blank

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