datafile > 2gb
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Thread: datafile > 2gb

  1. #1
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    datafile > 2gb

    aix 5.1 oracle 9, and i have datafiles of size 34gb.

    any comments?

  2. #2
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    yea... sucks to be you lol

    files those size aren't such a good idea. You stand to loose much data.
    Oracle it's not just a database it's a lifestyle!
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  3. #3
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    Coincidence! New on Ask Tom today:
    http://asktom.oracle.com/pls/ask/f?p...6197157123965,

  4. #4
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    Yes, good catch Dapi but you have to remember, Tom is an Oracle Lacky and he's going to always push Oracle stuff. Meaning that not everyone will be running RMAN that's going to be doing block recovery. If you don't have the block recovery or backup) ablility, then a 36 gig datafile might not be such a good idea.
    Oracle it's not just a database it's a lifestyle!
    --------------
    BTW....You need to get a girlfriend who's last name isn't .jpg

  5. #5
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    but the comment about losing much data is wrong, we have 17Gb datafiles and have 0 problem in backing up restoring or whatever and we dont use block level recovery, limiting yourself to 2gb is yesterdays news

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by davey23uk
    limiting yourself to 2gb is yesterdays news
    I disagree. Every try to copy a 17G file to another location and you run out of space after 16G?

    I think there are a couple of advantages of having multiple smaller files instead of one large file:
    1. Smaller files are easier to manage if your environment does a lot of cloning or moving between hosts.
    2. 4x4G files can be spread out on 4 devices rather than all 16G on one filesystem.
    Jeff Hunter
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  7. #7
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    I agree 100% on the limiting the size to 2 gigs statement being yesterdays news Davey. However, I agree with Tom in his statement "what is the biggest thing you want to manage as a unit". I just look at it from a manageablity point of view. Like in my case I have a 100gig tablespace. I break it up to have 10 10gig datafiles. I think it all goes back to what you're comfortable with, and what's an acceptable down time if you loose one of your datafiles. I know I would much rather recover one 10gig datafile, than one 37gig or 17gig one.
    Oracle it's not just a database it's a lifestyle!
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    BTW....You need to get a girlfriend who's last name isn't .jpg

  8. #8
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    better several datafiles instead of one, if you lose one then you are not losing the availability of all data, just one datafile

  9. #9
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    hi..thanks for all your feedbacks..

    greatly appreciate

  10. #10
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    Your Down time will be an issue

    Well one can go for big DB File , it all depends on your downtime acceptability.

    Call is yours, if ur business process allows high MTTR u can go for it.

    Though mangeability of large DB files is an issue.

    Regards

    Tan
    Tanmay

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