Preferred size of datafiles ...
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
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    Chester, England.
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    Preferred size of datafiles ...

    I'm going to export a database onto a new server.
    The DATA tablespace currently uses 7 x 100Mb datafiles.

    Should I import into 7 x 100Mb files? OR
    Should I import into 1 x 700Mb file OR
    Should I import into 4 x 200Mb files?

    What are the advnatages or disadvantages of setups like this?

    Its on Windows NT4, folks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    295
    It depends on the concurrency the tablespace will experience. If the files will be stored on the same disk, there is little difference between using a large datafile or several small datafiles. However, IMHO, fewer datafiles are easier to maintain than many.

    If you plan to partition data, it is advisable to separate the partitions on different disks to get some performance gain.
    An ounce of action is worth a ton of theory.
    —Friedrich Engels

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    California
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    2GB file size has been the de facto standard due to the 2GB file system limitation (32bit v 64bit).

    F.Y.I.
    My datafiles grow to a 2GB max.
    alapps

    Fast, Cheap, Reliable... Pick Two(2)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
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    Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
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    I'd create one datafile in your case.

    I use 2GB max on pre 8i and 4GB max post.

    Cheers,
    OCP 8i, 9i DBA
    Brisbane Australia

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
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    2,645
    Be wild, be creative. Use 700 1MB files and have fun.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    California
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    Originally posted by grjohnson
    I'd create one datafile in your case.

    I use 2GB max on pre 8i and 4GB max post.

    Cheers,
    If the O/S is 32bit, 4GB files are NOT an option unless a third party volume management software is used...
    alapps

    Fast, Cheap, Reliable... Pick Two(2)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
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    Germany.Laudenbach
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    Originally posted by alapps
    If the O/S is 32bit, 4GB files are NOT an option unless a third party volume management software is used...
    Hi,
    This is not correct for Windows NT, Filesysze (NTFS) can be bjond 2G. For example we had a datafile with 12G on NT;

    On 32-bit Linux u can use the ext3-Filesystem which includes large-file-support.

    on beos (to god for this it-world) filesize was manged even by a 64-Bit Pointer!

    Orca
    I am german :-) and i want do everything in allright so i use file-sizes
    : 64M, 256M, 512M , 1G, 2G
    i do not like to have a dschungel in my db-filestructure.
    But this has no effect on db-performance

    Orca
    Last edited by Orca777; 03-20-2003 at 02:19 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Location
    California
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    Orca,

    The O/S was not specified. The 2GB limitation was a warning...

    There are many installations that use Solaris 32bit.
    alapps

    Fast, Cheap, Reliable... Pick Two(2)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
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    Germany.Laudenbach
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    ok!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Geneva Switzerland
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    Originally posted by Orca777
    . . .for Windows NT, Filesysze (NTFS) can be bjond 2G. For example we had a datafile with 12G on NT.
    You may find periferal considerations for not having too big a size - e.g. PKZIP fails at 4Gb (I use it to refresh my Standby across the network). In future I would use 2Gb as a limit - but then mine is only a 10Gb db.
    "The power of instruction is seldom of much efficacy except in those happy dispositions where it is almost superfluous" - Gibbon, quoted by R.P.Feynman

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