Max number of datafiles per tablespace?
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Thread: Max number of datafiles per tablespace?

  1. #1
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    Unhappy

    Hi, guys!
    Could you tell me please max number of datafiles per tablespace for Oracle8i?
    Thank you

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    From Oracle8i Reference Release2 (8.1.6):

    Database files
    Maximum per tablespace: Operating system dependent; usually 1022
    Jurij Modic
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    24 hours in a day .... 24 beer in a case .... coincidence?

  4. #4
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    Originally posted by jmodic
    From Oracle8i Reference Release2 (8.1.6):

    Database files
    Maximum per tablespace: Operating system dependent; usually 1022
    There are some factors that influence on that number. When you create your DB with CREATE DATABASE, you use a parameter called MAXDATAFILES. It is the limit on the number of datafiles which can be associated with this database. In the init.ora, there is a parameter called DB_FILES. This is the limit on the total number of
    files related to this particular INSTANCE of a database.

    So, in Oracle Parallel Server you might have 1 DB but 4 instances that use the same DB.

    Additionally, the default and the range of values of maxdatafiles and db_files are operating system specific.

    In Unix and NT the number for a TS is 1022. There is no limit for VMS however.

    Thus, what Pipo and Jmodic told you might not be really the number you are looking for.


  5. #5
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    anyway, 99.99% of the databases won't even reach 100 datafiles, so 1022 or 1023 is far from being a reachable limit, except if you have 2Tb of data ... in one tablespace, which indicates that there is a slight problem of conception in the architecture ...

    [Edited by pipo on 10-02-2001 at 07:39 AM]

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by pipo
    anyway, 99.99% of the databases won't even reach 100 datafiles, so 1022 or 1023 is far from being a reachable limit, except if you have 2Tb of data ... in one tablespace, which indicates that there is a slight problem of conception in the architecture ...

    [Edited by pipo on 10-02-2001 at 07:39 AM]
    If your MAXDATAFILES has the UNIX default of 30, how can (s)he make 31 datafiles in his INDEX tablespace? Only if (s)he recreates the control file first :-)


  7. #7
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    Thank you guys!
    Anyway your answers is confused me.
    I had found in different sources different max values (1022 & 1023) as well. I am preparing for taking OCP test for Oracle 8i and I don't know which value is correct for that.
    Thank you.

  8. #8
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    Since Oracle 7, 1022 is the number per TS for most common platforms. It used to be much lower for Oracle 6.

    I think that it is always power(2,N)-2 for some N.


  9. #9
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    Originally posted by julian
    Since Oracle 7, 1022 is the number per TS for most common platforms
    No, in Oracle7 it used to be 1022 *per database*, not *per TS*. This changed in 8.0.
    Jurij Modic
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  10. #10
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    Yes, good remark. In Oracle 6 & 7, there was no limit for a TS, the value was for DB. In Oracle 6, much smaller value than in Oracle 7.

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